I really think i would’ve enjoyed reading your article and i think i may have gotten a lot out of it. However, trying to read around the block with “FOLLOW and icons for Facebook, Twitter etc.,” was infuriating!! I attempted to read your site on two different occasions and soon gave up both times. The second time i tried to get rid of the more than bothersome block by clicking on ea icon and choosing one of the actions to just get it out of my way, but no luck.
Many essential oils affect the skin and mucous membranes in ways that are valuable or harmful. Many essential oils, particularly tea tree oil, may cause contact dermatitis.[19][20][21][22] They are used in antiseptics and liniments in particular. Typically, they produce rubefacient irritation at first and then counterirritant numbness. Turpentine oil and camphor are two typical examples of oils that cause such effects. Menthol and some others produce a feeling of cold followed by a sense of burning. This is caused by its effect on heat-sensing nerve endings. Some essential oils, such as clove oil or eugenol, were popular for many hundred years in dentistry as antiseptics and local anesthetics.
Most flowers contain too little volatile oil to undergo expression, but their chemical components are too delicate and easily denatured by the high heat used in steam distillation. Instead, a solvent such as hexane or supercritical carbon dioxide is used to extract the oils.[10] Extracts from hexane and other hydrophobic solvents are called concretes, which are a mixture of essential oil, waxes, resins, and other lipophilic (oil-soluble) plant material.
For the last 15-20 years, essential oil therapy’s demand for clean, high quality oils has been stimulated by scientific analysis and research. The community has made some impact on the production and distribution practices of the worldwide essential oil industry. Everyone using essential oils in therapies as integrative medicine are creating a niche market for a new generation of essential oils. Analysis by and for therapists will continue to have positive influence on essential oil purity, quality, discovery and treatment.
AFNOR standards were established by The Association for French Normalization Organization Regulation for the French essential oil industry. The program was so successful that the International Standards Organization (ISO) adopted the AFNOR standards for essential oils and provides a list of these ISO standards and guidance for essential oils on their web site. Surprisingly enough, no USA Company or organization has adopted these standards to date and all continue to make silly claims to try to prove quality without any regulatory body supporting their claims.

"Therapeutic Grade" or anything along these lines is another common term used to describe "top quality oils". It sounds legit, but it is a marketing term that I am guilty of having used myself in the past when talking about oils. I thought it meant something. There isn't a therapeutic standard for essential oils so the name and any emblem associated with it is virtually meaningless. It's a self-regulated claim like many other healthwashing terms. Cropwatch explains here.
I have read quite a bit about YL and DoTerra and several other companies. The information available seems to suggest that Mr Young (founder of YL) is of questionable repute and has been caught out as a fraud selling a few different “natural” healing methods in the past. The people who founded DoTerra used to work for YL but were fired (or chose to leave) when they began to question YL practices, including the establishment of the Ecuadorian processing plant. No accusations were made but there were implications that perhaps what YL are actually doing is not aligned with what they are preaching. I was very interested to read the earlier comment that YL oils left stains on construction paper using the testing method suggested in the article.
You seem to be a bit touchy about research. I would suggest that you go to PubMed and search for “essential oils.” You will definitely find some scholarly research that has been published on the subject….but not nearly enough. (If you need a comparison, do a search for your favorite pharmaceutical drug). Given that publications are the currency for academic research, this would suggest that there aren’t as many researchers studying these essential oils as you seem to think.
“The medical system is even more terrible for women, whose experience of pain is routinely minimized by health practitioners. … Enter the wellness industry, which specializes in creating safe, welcoming, amber-lit spaces that make people feel cared-for and relaxed, and which treats the female body as its default. … The problem is that the rest of the wellness industry hitches a ride on their coattails of compassion and competency, benefiting from the utter lack of warmth found in mainstream medical treatment.”
I hope this helps to clarify doTERRA’s official position on the matter. In summary, d?TERRA has not and does not claim any certification, registration or approval of its essential oils by the FDA, AFNOR, ISO, or any other regulatory body. We do believe that the CTPG standard supports d?TERRA’s effort to bring to market only the most pure essential oils.
Thank you for all you are doing to educate all of us about essential oils. My question is this: I noticed earlier in this thread that one of your recommended sources of essential oils was a company called Appalachian Valley in Maryland. But I noticed later on that when you listed your recommended suppliers, Appalachian Valley is not on the list. Did you leave them off of your newer list for any particular reason? I would like to get some oils from them, but when I saw that your new list didn’t include them, I wondered whether I should rethink my potential purchase. So, does Appalachan Valley still pass muster, or no?
Thank you so much for all of your information that you share. It seems like when I google something about essential oils, I frequently end up on your site. I am new to essential oils and not sure what to expect. It seems like when I use them in lotion, roll-on, or even a eucalyptus steam the scent dissipates relatively quickly. I am not sure if I am not adding enough essential oils, if I am buying lower quality essential oils, or if I am expecting too much. For instance, a 8 oz batch of lotion (I used 30 drops total of essential oil)that I made last week no longer has a scent to it (at least to me). Any insight on this?

The International Organization for Standardization (ISO) is a worldwide federation of national standards bodies from over 100 countries, one from each country. ISO is a non-governmental organization established in 1947. The mission of ISO is to promote the development of standardization and related activities in the world with a view to facilitating the international exchange of goods and services, and to developing cooperation in the spheres of intellectual, scientific, technological and economic activity.

Refreshing and radiant, we carry several varieties of Lemon Essential Oil. Two of our most popular sellers are the regular Lemon and the Lemon 5 Fold, for their long-lasting, pleasant fragrance. The aroma is intensely citrusy and fresh, with wonderful zesty top notes. The Lemon 5 Fold is highly concentrated which makes it especially desirable for cosmetics, as well as soap and candle manufacturing.
After buying several carrier oils and essential oils on Amazon, I’m now wondering if I’ve wasted my money. It’s just sad that consumers can’t get honest information regarding a product. While not all EO’s and carriers have to be expensive, it’s weeding out the ones that are pure vs. cut/synthetic that’s the hardest. I think this is what turns some newbies off from using EO’s for Therapeutic purposes… they buy an EO expecting a certain result, see none, and then, understandably, think they “just don’t work.”

Oh, my, I need to apologize. I evidently left my reply/question before the entire page of this thread had loaded. I didn’t see that you and others had mentioned doTERRA. That is the company I’m with and I do trust them very much. As I indicated before, much of that trust is based on my experience of their oils compared to other oils I’ve used over the last 20 years.
Essential Oil benefits and uses includes aiding sleep, relieving sleep and anxiety, massage therapies, a good air freshener, excellent cleaning agents, pain reliever, support weight loss, prevent cancer and aid digestion. Other benefits includes supporting nail health, detoxifying the body, treating allergies, treating depression, support healthy joints and bones, treating respiratory illness, promoting mental alertness, supporting circulation, balancing hormones, treating motion sickness and supporting heart health.
I just came across Organic Infusions and am curious as to how you like them. I haven’t seen that you’ve come back to this post and would love to hear some review on this company. I will go ahead and place an order for a couple things, (geranium and lavender) and see how they compare to Aura Casia that I’ve used for years. I also like Oshadhi, but it’s not a direct company. I have to agree on the doTerra and YL issue, very sketchy indeed and I’ve stayed away from them, more because I don’t feel that the people selling the product are trained enough. We shouldn’t be ingesting EO’s, that’s not what they’re for. I hope one of you will come back and review this company. Thank you =)

As far as I can tell, ‘wintergreen oil’ is not listed anywhere by the FDA. Methyl salicylate IS permitted by the FDA as an indirect food additive, when is is a constituent of an adhesive. It is not on their ‘regular’ indirect food additive list – only the one that applies to adhesives. But I can’t see it on any negative list, and I can’t see a maximum permitted amount.


Other essential oil manufacturers/distributors sell certified organic oils; DoTerra does not. other essential oil manufacturers do not use MLM scams to sell their products; DoTerra does. Other essential oil companies tell people up front that the FDA has not “approved this” info; DoTerra does not. Other companies warn people, as the association for aromatherapists does, that these oils should NEVER be ingested: DoTerra tells people to ingest them (BTW, there IS no “safe dose”; the “safe dose” is “none”). Other companies do not pretend to have scientific evidence when there isn’t any. Other companies don’t make up fake “certifications”. Your ridiculous comparison of tylenol or ibuprofen is just that: those are MADE to be ingested, and essential oils are NEVER meant to be ingested.
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) classifies essential oils as food supplements, not drugs. This means producers of essential oils are not allowed to market the compounds as medicine. In fact, they must clearly state the product is “not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.” According to the Dietary Supplemental Health and Education Act of 1994, this classification also means the FDA is not allowed to regulate the sale or use of essential oils unless they can prove a particular product poses a serious threat.
Absolute essential oils are similar to their pure distilled and cold-pressed counterparts, but for various reasons the extraction process is more involved and requires the use of chemical solvents that are removed later in the production process. NOW Solutions offers two absolutes, Rose and Jasmine, which are extracted with solvents and clearly listed as such on our product labels. These two absolutes are produced by using the solvents hexane and ethanol in sequence, which are then actively reclaimed and removed via a stripping distillation process that leaves the essential oil portion intact.
They tell me this is a myth that quite a number of people are spreading but its hard for me to believe that there are people out there who are actually accepting this as a viable explanation. But I guess there must be a significant amount of people believing it because a number of you have asked me to address this. I suppose it comes from the desperate attempt for people to come up with some kind of positive explanation for any adverse reactions that natural products might cause us. I mean we all know that if something is natural that it must be good for us, right?
Anyway, I found a local store that makes (distills?) their own. I enjoy going there to pick out and purchase my oils. Plus I love to support my community. However, I’m still stuck on the idea of food grade. My local place says their EOs are not food grade and shouldn’t be ingested. So do those MLMs do something to their oils to make them safe to consume or is my local place just saying that to cover their butts?
In addition to their intrinsic benefits to plants and being beautifully fragrant to people, essential oils have been used throughout history in many cultures for their medicinal and therapeutic benefits. Modern scientific study and trends towards more holistic approaches to wellness are driving a revival and new discovery of essential oil health applications.
The unfortunate thing is that the information is just passed from rep to rep down the MLM sales chain and the layperson doesn’t question if it is correct or if it could do harm. How easy would it be to assume that you could put a drop of wintergreen oil in a glass of water to relieve pain because you can with all of the others right? Ingesting wintergreen oil is like taking a large quantity of aspirin – highly toxic. However, these oils are sold as harmless, safe and natural. They couldn’t hurt you, right?

Yes, essential oil adulteration exists, though this doesn’t always involve synthetic chemicals. One of the most common frauds is to add lavandin oil to lavender oil, though this is not difficult to detect with GC analysis. But, the idea that virtually all essential oils that are sold in health stores are, by definition, adulterated, is baseless. There is no evidence for it, and there never has been any.

Hi. I’m hearing conflicting opinions regarding using lavender oil on my children. I have a 10 yr. old son & 7 yr. old daughter. I love to use the lavender with peppermint & lemon for my son’s allergies. I will also rub some on his temples for a headache. I will also apply to my daughter’s temples for a headache or put a couple drops in her bath. Is this OK? I’ve heard especially in boys that you should not use lavender because it has estrogen in it.

Samantha has a popular health and fitness blog called Jacked on the Beanstalk where she shares her secrets to success, including fitness, meal plans coaching and why she decided to adopt a vegan lifestyle and how it has helped her become so successful. Samantha was awarded her pro card in July 2014 after winning first place in the overall bikini title at the 2014 INBF South Western Natural Championships in Austin Texas. This put her on the map as the first-ever VEGAN WNBF bikini pro.
Hi Dave, So sorry to hear about the medical issues your family is facing. There is quite a bit written about using essential oils for cancer though I don’t have the info at my finger tips. I would be happy to see if I can find more info on where to direct you if you haven’t already found it. If you have an email or Facebook or some other way to be reached it might be a better way to converse. But either way one place you can go to get some ideas about other peoples experiences with various oils is oil-testimonials.com you can sign up for the free membership and then do searches on whatever you would like.”leukemia” “child leukemia” “Crohns” etc. It was formed for people using YL oils to share so some of the blends mentioned will be YL but it doesn’t mean you have to use YL to get the results. High quality oils are high quality oils, that said quality is so important especially when talking about treating something as major as the things you are and in my experience YL does produce high quality oils. I myself have treated Tertiary Chronic Lyme and having used both traditional antibiotics (IV, pills, suspension and sometimes all at the same time) and essential oils and can attest to the oils working as well as any other protocol I have been on without the side effects…well you probably see where I’m going. That doesn’t mean Young Living is the only company producing oils of that quality, they aren’t, nor does it mean I’m advocating the MLM approach, signing up was worth while for me to receive the discount since I order so many oils and I will sometimes order for other people at my discount but I have never pursued the business end of it. I also have and do use other companies oils and think investigating and having several sources is wise for various reasons. Anyway, sorry to go on so much your situation just struck a nerve. Feel free to contact me if you would like.
Yes, many companies do GC/MS testing and infrared. The real test is, what do they compare the results to and what is that company’s standard for what a good oil is? If their standard is high, then they may reject oils which are below that standard. If their standard is not so high, then they will accept and sell more oils, even ones that have been rejected by a company with higher standards.
Per ATTN’s reporting, the FDA sent similar warnings to doTERRA and another company, and FDA spokesperson Lindsay Meyer informed the outlet that consumers should be wary of fraud and scams that involve claims to prevent, treat or cure health conditions. “Health fraud scams waste money and can lead to delays in getting proper diagnosis and treatment. They can also cause serious or even fatal injuries,” she told ATTN.
Crunchy Betty, I have a question. I am new and learning about using essential oils and loving it, but having a problem with the scents not lasting as a perfume on my body. I mean not lasting even an hour. I am using essential oils purchased at one of the reputable companies that you recommend above. I am using a base of Jojoba and then blending other essential oils to make a scent. What am I doing wrong?
Finally learned that mag isn’t well absorbed in the gut and can have unwanted side effects if you take enough to help the deficiency, but that it’s very well absorbed through the skin. Epsom salts baths help some people, but we only have a shower. Besides, magnesium *chloride* (ES is mag sulfate) is a much better type of magnesium and has quicker effects on the deficiency. Absorption through the skin doesn’t have the same side effects as taking it into the gut.
Well said, Marcia. I sell essential oils and I am so tired of people with their “therapeutic grade” and purity labels when they have absolutely no evidence of a sort. Recently, I was on Facebook where a gentleman leveled that he buys from only one source because all the essential oils in stores are adultrated. Hate to say this, but many people don’t bother checking things out. They hear the right lingo and they put doctors and other so-called professionals. Having had so many people I know try to suck me into one MLM scheme or another, I know well their basic set up. They patent these phrases and whatnot, but actually, the emphasis is on bringing people in, not quality. Anyone can slap a patented label on an oil, but I sincerely doubt that they’ve done any kind of real research into the oils they sell. Sounds like they’re trying to elbow in on Young Living territory. Most people who set up MLMs are about money, they amble from one idea to the next. The get a few know-it-alls to back them up, if they’re that lucky, and they sucker people in with making money. I have a friend suckered into this Juice Plus stuff and the fluff she spouts about it. Anything to sell a product. When you research most of their claims they’re chocked full of misstatements, fabrications and outright lies. They haven’t done nearly the amount of research they claimed to have, they just put a lot of money into making the videos and charts. I’m sick of it all.
This great information provided by all. I don’t believe the originator of this blog is stating the oils are good or bad, but stating that FDA has them approved. I have been purchasing essential oils from several companies, and before I do I find out if there are additives, water downed (yes someone told me they water down their oil to make it go further). In my research, there is NO FDA approval for internal or external use. All my companies have a disclaimer stating same whether in oils, bath salts or incense. There are standards the FDA puts out, but not ‘approvals’.
Well said, Marcia. I sell essential oils and I am so tired of people with their “therapeutic grade” and purity labels when they have absolutely no evidence of a sort. Recently, I was on Facebook where a gentleman leveled that he buys from only one source because all the essential oils in stores are adultrated. Hate to say this, but many people don’t bother checking things out. They hear the right lingo and they put doctors and other so-called professionals. Having had so many people I know try to suck me into one MLM scheme or another, I know well their basic set up. They patent these phrases and whatnot, but actually, the emphasis is on bringing people in, not quality. Anyone can slap a patented label on an oil, but I sincerely doubt that they’ve done any kind of real research into the oils they sell. Sounds like they’re trying to elbow in on Young Living territory. Most people who set up MLMs are about money, they amble from one idea to the next. The get a few know-it-alls to back them up, if they’re that lucky, and they sucker people in with making money. I have a friend suckered into this Juice Plus stuff and the fluff she spouts about it. Anything to sell a product. When you research most of their claims they’re chocked full of misstatements, fabrications and outright lies. They haven’t done nearly the amount of research they claimed to have, they just put a lot of money into making the videos and charts. I’m sick of it all.
It is important that people research the oils they are using – as not all EO’s are created equally and MANY on the market can be harmful when used improperly. Industry standards are very lax and an EO is only required to have a minimum of 2% essential oil in the bottle to be classified as pure – the rest can be synthetics or fillers. I chose Young Living Essential Oils because I know – without a doubt that from the minute the seed is planted to the minute it goes into the bottle – proper care and precision has been taken to ensure only the highest quality oil on the market. Young Living is the ONLY company in the world who has taken it one step further by having our own farms, doing our own harvesting, cultivating, distilling, testing and bottling of our products as well.
In the United States, aromatherapy is regulated by how it is intended for use: cosmetic, drug, fragrance, food additive for consumption, or “something else.” Therefore, if a claim is made by any natural substance or an essential oil that makes it appear as a drug, and it hasn’t gone through the FDA approval process for this, the claim is in violation of the drug standards. (This does not imply that the oil itself is unsafe, rather, that the proper protocol for approval was not adhered to.)
You sound so anti-DoTerra that you lose all credibility. You sound like you’ve invested so much in time and effort in bashing DoTerra, that you’d keep bashing them no matter what research was done on their oils. I don’t really care what your background is, you’ve lost all credibility by the way that you’ve vehemently bashed the DoTerra company completely. Do you know what Medical Doctor’s do as research? They try out things, and look at the results. My results in using DoTerra oils compared with other oils is that they have worked better. I haven’t used all the different brands, but out of the ones I’ve used, DoTerra have given me the best results. It’s not unsafe to ingest certain essential oils, at all. It’s like saying that it’s unsafe to ingest tylenol, or ibuprofen. It’s not unsafe when done in the proper quantities. You’re ignorant by denouncing a companies’ product just because of the way that they’ve chosen to market it. By the way, DoTerra has grown into a company with more than 100 million dollars in sales per year in just 6 years, marketing the way that they do. I think they’ve made wise business decisions up to this point by marketing the way that they have. I don’t sell DoTerra, because I’m not interested in doing sales, at all. But, their oils work really well, and I personally have seen great benefits from using them.
Some essential oils qualify as GRAS flavoring agents for use in foods, beverages, and confectioneries according to strict Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) and flavorist standards.[48] Pharmacopoeia standards for medicinal oils should be heeded. Some oils can be toxic to some domestic animals, cats in particular.[49] The internal use of essential oils can pose hazards to pregnant women, as some can be abortifacients in dose 0.5–10 mL, and thus should not be used during pregnancy.[citation needed]
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