Hi. I’m hearing conflicting opinions regarding using lavender oil on my children. I have a 10 yr. old son & 7 yr. old daughter. I love to use the lavender with peppermint & lemon for my son’s allergies. I will also rub some on his temples for a headache. I will also apply to my daughter’s temples for a headache or put a couple drops in her bath. Is this OK? I’ve heard especially in boys that you should not use lavender because it has estrogen in it.
It is essential to measure every compound within an oil-producing plant. They are concerned with more than fragrance, after all. The EOBBD total physical analysis measures down to 0.01% of all compounds in the essential oil. This is where quality is found. Smaller compounds are often necessary for activating the major compounds, making all the difference in whether the oils are effective for therapeutic use.
Samantha has a popular health and fitness blog called Jacked on the Beanstalk where she shares her secrets to success, including fitness, meal plans coaching and why she decided to adopt a vegan lifestyle and how it has helped her become so successful. Samantha was awarded her pro card in July 2014 after winning first place in the overall bikini title at the 2014 INBF South Western Natural Championships in Austin Texas. This put her on the map as the first-ever VEGAN WNBF bikini pro.

Unfortunately, this ignited and resurfaced some of the studies that are often quoted regarding the toxicity of essential oils and children. These sources for toxicity where some of the very same ones in which I reviewed and discussed the caveats to here. The sources that are referenced by the poison center also were lacking in some information I was seeking. They do not include the essential oil company, quality of the oil, and some where related to one isolated or synthetic constituent. The parts of an essential oil are not the same as the synergy of the whole essential oil.
As is pointed out in the article EOs are not really “Oils” in the sense that they lack the lipid content necessary to make them a true oil. That is why we need carrier oils – that is what allows the EOs to be absorbed into the skin and thus into the cellular level. The carrier picks up the EO and transports it through the lipid barrier of the cells where they work. At a guess the carrier acts as a buffer in the bloodstream limiting the potential irritation of the EO to the bloodstream.
There has never been a documented instance of an anti-body response (i.e. sensitization) to an essential oil. Essential oil antibodies have never been found or detected in anyone. Unless sensitization occurs and antibodies are produced and stored in the body, there can be no allergic reaction. Therefore, we can state unequivocally that essential oils are not and cannot be allergens. Sometimes people do have allergy-like reactions but these are no allergenic in nature. They are detox reactions.
I’m familiar with EO at one time I used YL the only problem with that is they were to expensive in my opinion. So I quit for awhile. I deal on a daily basis with fibromylgia,osteoarthritis and anxiety. Due to all this my doctor took me off of a sleeping pill said I was sleeping to much in the day plus I went to the library for a free class about sleeping patterns and I was told to get off the OTC sleeping meds. Wow want to talk about a withdraw plus the lack of sleep I was getting. I was like an owl still sleeping in the day up at night. I had to do something. My sister told me about piping rock that’s where she’d been getting her essential oils. So I got my Lavender and Bergamont and at reasonable prices.Their great I sleep well now.
Robert you are the MAN! Thank you for being a voice of reason and knowledge. More importantly, thank you for calling people on their BS! To often people will be reluctant to speak up when confronted with individuals or companies spreading misinformation to further their agenda (and profit motive). Fact and fiction are not differences of opinion. Massage magazine should be ashamed. Instead they give an idiotic response, in essence saying, “we don’t know anything so it’s inappropriate that we educate ourselves before we send info out the our industry”.
Speaking of “pure” essential oils, what exactly does that mean? Unfortunately, since there is no official or standardized definition of purity, it means very little with regards to the therapeutic value of any essential oil. Even an oil that is 100% pure may not have been processed correctly and may not provide more than a mild, pleasant fragrance.  Perfumery oils, fragrance oils, and flavorings often provide a stronger pleasant fragrance, but do not offer the therapeutic benefit of true essential oils. The amount of therapeutically effective chemical constituents in essential oils can vary from season to season, from year to year, or vary based on where the plant is grown. The essential oil extraction process also affects how this chemical balance is maintained from the time of plant harvesting to having the essential oil arrive in your home.

Now, before we dig in, it’s important to remember that just because something is regulated, approved, standardized, or widely available doesn’t mean it is inert, especially when misused. This means for the safe use of any substance, natural or synthetic, following the instructions for intended and proper use, not over-dosing, using common sense, and considering the individual’s unique biochemistry and health history are all paramount.


In the world of essential oils there is an enormous amount of controversy and competition, with some companies accusing other companies of being less pure, while others claim trademarks and exclusivity on their products. All of this noise creates plenty of confusion for the average consumer to sift through, especially since there is no official regulation or oversight on the essential oil industry, federal or otherwise.


A third trademark has been registered (as a word mark) CPTG Certified Pure Therapeutic Grade also by DoTERRA Holdings, LLC, 370 W. Center Street,  Orem, UT 84057.  Filed on March 4, 2009, published for opposition on July 14, 2009 and official registration granted on September 29, 2009. This registration also has the disclaimer, “No claim is made to the exclusive right to use ‘certified pure therapeutic grade’ apart from the mark as shown”. There is a long list of products shown to be associated with this word mark.
Specific essential oils are used to treat certain conditions, though exact types of oils used and how they are combined varies depending on the experience and training of the aromatherapist. (The National Association for Holistic Aromatherapy (www.naha.org) and the Alliance of International Aromatherapists (www.alliance-aromatherapists.org) are two organizations that have national educational standards for aromatherapists).
Some oils can be applied directly to the skin, this is called using the oil “neat”. That does not mean to say that you shouldn’t dilute the oil in certain cases. Always dilute when applying to children and always check instructions from the company on how to apply the oil. Some need to be diluted to prevent skin irritation like peppermint. Those oils are considered “hot” and the irritation they cause is unpleasant to say the least. Research the oil before using and allow your body time to respond to each new oil before introducing a new one. Your body will tell you if you need more or less dilution with each oil If you give it enough time to respond.
Thank you for sharing your knowledge with us. I’m researching essential oils for treatment of an ear infection in my little one, and I wondered about “pharmaceutical grade” vs. other types, and your posts here have given me my answer. Your well-written responses to other people above have given me some great insight. I’ll do my due diligence before using anything on my daughter. You’ve done a great job of underscoring the need to know in order to have a safe and desirable outcome. Thank you.
It’s been a few months since you posted, and I hope you are feeling better! My youngest is now 10 and I am JUST now, as I am learning about my peri-menopausal experience, getting an understanding on my postpartum experience. I struggled for months with each kid and now I am pretty sure the base-line physical issue was hormonal imbalance. I have been taking a product from Young Living called Progessence Plus, and it has been a life-saver– I wish I had it when I was postpartum. Look it up, theres a PDF by Dr. Dan Purser talking about the product that answers a lot of questions and helped me a lot when I was researching. There are other oils from YL that help a lot with hormonal issues, Dragon Time, Schlaressence, Lady Schlerol. (Use my distributer #1112524 🙂 if you want to buy from YL)
Its funny with essential oils and companies because it seems like once people pick a company there is a heavy “following” and bickering goes on between users on who is better. I think that is silly. Everyone is different and every company is different. Different products but also different guides and marketing will impact each person in a unique way. Thats why its so nice to have options. Both with honest companies and with choices of which oil to use for what.

I was wondering. I have a friend that has neuropathy. I do too. I use wintergreen diluted with fractionated coconut oil or a blend called deep blue, and sometimes peppermint oil for this. The friend asked the question, Can you mix all oils safely? As she has found on pinterest a recipe for it where you mix 8 different oils. I am not sure of the oils she has listed, but is this safe?

doTERRA wanted to create a purity level that goes above and beyond organic. So they created an internal standard called Certified Pure Therapeutic Grade that is verified by 3rd party testing laboratories. They test their oils 7 different ways to make sure that they are pure and safe for therapeutic use. Even though doTERRA essential oils are not “certified organic“(read why in next paragraph), you can be assured that they are a step above organic.

One of the things I like about that group is that the folks who belong to it regularly collect their pennies and have TRULY independent testing done on the brands and “flavors” of oils the group, not just an individual, selects, typically the same oil from three different sources at a time. Someone in the group buys the oils themselves and sends them, along with the fee, to an independent lab outside the US. They have tested both organic and inorganic oils. They have tested all sorts of brands, including doTERRA and Young Living. The results of those tests are posted on her website. GO READ THEM FOR YOURSELVES!
I’m pleased to hear that you are happy with your supplier. Personally, I prefer certified organic oils, and I don’t look to essential oil purveyors for information about aromatherapy. We already have a problem with conventional health care being controlled by pharmaceutical companies, and going down the same road with essential oils doesn’t feel right to me.
NOW’s founder Elwood Richard said it best when he was asked why NOW’s prices are so much lower than our competitors. “The question shouldn’t be why are our prices so low, but rather, why do our competitors price their products so high?” We use the same quality essential oils as other companies; we just choose to price our essential oils with the best interests of the consumer in mind. By not marking up our essential oils like perfumes, as many competitors do, we can offer essential oils of comparable quality at a lower price.
The Ananda Apothecary operates business hours of Monday – Friday, 9am – 5pm MST. You can call 1-303-440-3766 for Customer Service or contact custserv@anandaapothecary.com. This brand also offers a newsletter, social media channels, and a neat “Aroma Science” section where you can learn a whole bunch of detailed essential oil information from their staff chemist (who is also their most active writer).

Taken by mouth, many essential oils can be dangerous in high concentrations. Typical effects begin with a burning feeling, followed by salivation. In the stomach, the effect is carminative, relaxing the gastric sphincter and encouraging eructation (belching). Further down the gut, the effect typically is antispasmodic.[14] Typical ingredients for such applications include eucalyptus oils, menthol, capsaicin, anise, and camphor.[citation needed]
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