To the woman who got a rash from putting Frankincense on her skin: First and foremost, you should never be using undiluted essential oils on your skin, except in very specific cases (i.e. you need to heal a cut with helichrysum, etc). If you did that and you got a rash, don’t blame the company who made the oil. You can develop sensitivities to the plants by using them full strength topically… it doesn’t matter who made it. You’re not using them correctly if you are using them undiluted.

USE ESSENTIAL OILS TO HELP YOUR MOOD. Lavender, peppermint, grapefruit, chamomile, lemon, ylang-ylang all help produce happy, joyous moods. Clary sage helps with PMS (although there have been reports that overuse of clary sage can lead to intoxication). Rosemary increases focus and concentration. Don’t forget the mood benefits of essential oils. Here’s an information packed aromatherapy reference chart to refer to.
Only pesticide residues that are hydrophilic, thermostable, and volatile can be carried over into an essential oil during distillation. Few pesticides possess these characteristics, so pesticide levels found in distilled oils are typically insignificant. In one large database, out of 73,541 analytical results on distilled essential oils, only 0.55% had positive results for pesticide detection.
Inside the living plant, essential oils serve several purposes, one of which is defense. Acting like the plant’s immune system, the oils help it fight off fungus or bacterial infection, and protect it from insects and animals. Another purpose is reproduction; the pleasing aromas attract pollinating insects like bees and butterflies. We’re not the only animals who like the smell of flowers.
Now, before we dig in, it’s important to remember that just because something is regulated, approved, standardized, or widely available doesn’t mean it is inert, especially when misused. This means for the safe use of any substance, natural or synthetic, following the instructions for intended and proper use, not over-dosing, using common sense, and considering the individual’s unique biochemistry and health history are all paramount.
“CPTG®” and “CPTG – Certified Pure Therapeutic Grade®” are terms that d?TERRA has trademarked. As such, the words shown together are registered with the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO), meaning the words in that phrase are registered, not the oils. Another example is Visa Card’s registered trademark: “Bring Home the Gold.” No one should mistake d?TERRA’s registered intellectual property right as somehow a registration of the essential oils.
Heavy Metal testing shows the amount of heavy metal content in the essential oil. When properly distilled, essential oils should not contain heavy metals. ICP-MS testing uses a high-energy medium called Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) to ionize the sample. The sample is then run through a mass spectroscope, which separates the sample into its elemental parts and provides a reading about which elements are present and at what quantities.
There is no evidence to suggest essential oils are effective (or safe) as the primary treatment of diseases and symptoms that fall outside the mind-body connection. Remember, when you use an essential oil and expect a specific outcome, you are relying on the biochemical activity of the compound in question. Many plants are biochemically active in humans and classified as drugs. These “natural” products have undergone rigorous scientific study to prove they work and determine what dangers they pose.
The Young Living Speech you give is completely inaccurate and part of the genius marketing used by YL. Oils that have “do not consume” are protecting themselves from lawsuits, it’s a reasonable label statement. I am an educator at a major US University teaching essential oil studies. I have worked in production and quality control of essential oils.
To date, there has been no company or organization that certifies essential oils. The MOA was established to fill this need. Companies who wish to have an independent organization test the quality of their oils for ISO compliance can contact the MOA to conduct independent testing and certification. Companies who pass these tests can then proudly state that their essential oil is of ISO quality and therefore is a true “Medicinal Grade” oil. Ethical companies will use this standard in their marketing literature. Oils produced only for fragrance need not apply.
Which brings me to Young Loving. Sigh. I really LOVE their oils. They have a clarity that I just don’t find, reliably, from any other company that I have tried. I did the whole kit and membership thing but only for my own needs. I’m not here to sell anybody anything. I use a lot of their other products as well and have been happy with my purchases (except for the Rose Ointment that has Patchouli in it. I hate Patchouli).

“USE ESSENTIAL OILS TO HELP YOUR MOOD. Lavender, peppermint, grapefruit, chamomile, lemon, ylang-ylang all help produce happy, joyous moods. Clary sage helps with PMS (although there have been reports that overuse of clary sage can lead to intoxication). Rosemary increases focus and concentration. Don’t forget the mood benefits of essential oils. Here’s an information packed aromatherapy reference chart to refer to.”

Latin names with very specific meanings are given to each plant's genus family and species. There are multiple plants within each genus and family, sometimes hundreds. If an essential oils company fails to harvest the correct species with the correct botanical name, they will not be yielding the correct compounds for therapeutic effect. E.O.B.B.D assesses for the full botanical species in order to pinpoint precisely the chemical compounds within.


Hi Dave, So sorry to hear about the medical issues your family is facing. There is quite a bit written about using essential oils for cancer though I don’t have the info at my finger tips. I would be happy to see if I can find more info on where to direct you if you haven’t already found it. If you have an email or Facebook or some other way to be reached it might be a better way to converse. But either way one place you can go to get some ideas about other peoples experiences with various oils is oil-testimonials.com you can sign up for the free membership and then do searches on whatever you would like.”leukemia” “child leukemia” “Crohns” etc. It was formed for people using YL oils to share so some of the blends mentioned will be YL but it doesn’t mean you have to use YL to get the results. High quality oils are high quality oils, that said quality is so important especially when talking about treating something as major as the things you are and in my experience YL does produce high quality oils. I myself have treated Tertiary Chronic Lyme and having used both traditional antibiotics (IV, pills, suspension and sometimes all at the same time) and essential oils and can attest to the oils working as well as any other protocol I have been on without the side effects…well you probably see where I’m going. That doesn’t mean Young Living is the only company producing oils of that quality, they aren’t, nor does it mean I’m advocating the MLM approach, signing up was worth while for me to receive the discount since I order so many oils and I will sometimes order for other people at my discount but I have never pursued the business end of it. I also have and do use other companies oils and think investigating and having several sources is wise for various reasons. Anyway, sorry to go on so much your situation just struck a nerve. Feel free to contact me if you would like.
There are several EO blends or normal oils that are safe, like oregano. There are others that are toxic to the body internally, but fine diffused. When in doubt, do the research. Obviously, if you can eat the plant, like cinnamon, the oil, if taken in a gel tab isn’t toxic. Drinking it directly will burn. Hot oil vs cool oil. Some like lemon, lime, orange, peppermint are fine in water. Learn each oil, as each one, like each child, has its own properties and should be used in the right way.
Danika – you keep saying that “just because Young Living says it’s safe” – we’re not only learning that it’s safe from Young Living – MANY representatives for Young Living have taken it upon themselves to read and educate themselves extensively on the use of EO’s aromatically, topically and internally. Just because you believe that EO’s shouldn’t be used internally (due to your method of training) – doesn’t mean is wrong! For centuries EO’s were used aromatically, topically and INTERNALLY without harmful side effects. I do agree that a level of RESPONSIBILITY needs to used – as with any “medicinal product” – that goes without saying – but to literally sit there and accuse DoTerra or Young Living representatives of being un-educated or willingly harming people – you’re being very ignorant, cruel and narrow-minded.

Companies that do not analyze their oils and adulterate their oils are not only being deceptive but irresponsible. After all, synthetic compounds in oils such as synthetic linalyl acetate and propylene glycol are harmful to the body and place the consumer at risk. Please do not support these companies! If your company does not display the MOA logo on its website, label or brochure, do not trust it and do not support these companies.
 This last trademark has been registered (as a word mark) by DoTERRA Holdings, LLC, 370 W. Center Street,  Orem, UT 84057.  Filed on March 4, 2009, published for opposition on July 1, 2009 and official registration granted on October 6, 2009.  This registration has the disclaimer, “No claim is made to the exclusive right to use ‘certified pure therapeutic grade’ apart from the mark as shown.

We found that boswellic acids contents depended on hydrodistillation duration and temperature (Table? 2). Essential oils prepared from longer distillation time and higher distillation temperature contained greater amounts of boswellic acids. For example, boswellic acids contents in Fractions III (19.6%) and IV (30.1%) were higher than those detected in Fraction I (0.9%) or II (0.8%) essential oil.
Oh, my, I need to apologize. I evidently left my reply/question before the entire page of this thread had loaded. I didn’t see that you and others had mentioned doTERRA. That is the company I’m with and I do trust them very much. As I indicated before, much of that trust is based on my experience of their oils compared to other oils I’ve used over the last 20 years.
I just started using EO’s, several of my friends sell YL EO’s and that is all they recommend, however, doing my own research I’ve settled on Mountain Rose Herb. The EO’s are great quality and are resonable. I’ve bought twice as much for half the price. I like MRH because it is organic, sustainable and fair trade. Use your own judgement and choose what you think is best. I will say this, everytime I’m on facebook and some one asks about EO’s I do recommend MRH with no sales pitch, just “try MRH” and almost the next post is a marketing speech telling the same person about YL and why they are the only ones to go with. So like I said, do your research and I’d say “try MRH”
As the vaporized microscopic particles come into contact with the soft and moist tissue inside your nose and sinuses their beneficial properties enter directly into your bloodstream and get dispersed throughout your body. At the same time they travel up the olfactory nerve (the one that operates your sense of smell) to the limbic region of your brain where you process feelings and emotions. This is also an important area of the brain involved in memory. Smell and memory are processed through the same part of the brain; that’s why when you smell cookies baking in the oven you may have flashbacks of childhood.
Essential oils are extracted by several methods including distillation (water, steam, water and steam), cold pressing, enfleurage, solvent extraction and CO2 extraction. The choice of extraction method varies according to the chemical constituents, the delicate nature of certain plant materials, or the desired result. For example, fractioning, a distillation technique, separates specific chemical constituents, owing to their varied boiling points and evaporation rates. This is particularly useful in the perfume and flavor industries.

I am trying to write an essay for a public health post grad course, the role of the public health worker.. I won’t bore you with the details… I’m trying to tentatively suggest that education is a major role….non antibiotic therapies for infectious disease, for example tea tree in the treatment of staphlococcal…. can you suggest any reading/authors/doctors I can explore?
Derek Simnett is a personal friend of us here at CE.  We have watched his journey unfold over the years and it has been incredible to see. TRULY authentic in his message and lifestyle, Derek is living proof that you can not only achieve big results on a plant-based diet, but you can do A LOT without lifting much weight. His primary mode of training is calisthenics. Check out his stuff here. He is also on YouTube.
I do have one BIG complaint about do-terra and it has nothing to do with the quality of their oils. They tell their young impressionable (and unlearned) people that their oils are so pure that they can be mixed with food, beverages, or put in capsules for anti-biotic use. Lets get two things straight here, “Antibiotic properties” are not the same as an “anti-biotic” and if you actually did ingest enough EO to actually do what they profess they can do, it would probably kill you as it would be so toxic.
Essential oils are not really oils. They do not contain the fatty acids that constitute what we would consider an actual oil. Valerie Gennari Cooksley, author of Aromatherapy: Soothing Remedies to Restore, Rejuvenate and Heal defines essential oils as “highly concentrated plant constituents possessing potent medicinal and cosmetic qualities.” However, I think Stephanie Tourles nailed it in Organic Body Care recipes when she said, “I consider essential oils the life force or the soul of the plant.”
I bought a jar of mag chloride at WF and tried it as a for soak for him. It worked the very first night! However, that jar ( a little over a cup) was $15. am very frugal, (hence interested in this article) and after doing much shopping around I ordered a large bag of Ancient Minerals Magnesium Flakes from Amazon, and it works out so much less expensive that way. Now I use 1/2c in a gallon of the hottest water possible and he soaks for 30 minutes each night. No more cramps. BONUS: when he’s done, I reheat half of that water in the micro and soak my own feet in it. I have osteoarthritis and general soreness all over, and there is a significant difference in my pain level now, as well. Mag is a great anti inflammatory nutrient.
Its funny with essential oils and companies because it seems like once people pick a company there is a heavy “following” and bickering goes on between users on who is better. I think that is silly. Everyone is different and every company is different. Different products but also different guides and marketing will impact each person in a unique way. Thats why its so nice to have options. Both with honest companies and with choices of which oil to use for what.
You can dig a little deeper to find out what the specific characteristics and components are in essential oils. “Various countries, including the United States, have published ‘pharmacopeias’ (check out The United States Pharmacopeial Convention) that outline exacting chemical and physical standards along with chromatography specifications for hundreds of botanical oils,” says Artemis. There is also a universal standard for most botanical maintained by The International Standards Organization.
Standardized oils are those which have been altered from their naturally balanced state. They can be adulterated with all natural constituents. An example of this would be Lavender. True Lavender is Lavandula angustifolia. Most of the flowers and oil from France are actually a cross between Lavandula angustifolia and Lavandula latifolia and should more properly be referred to as Lavandin (Lavandula x intermedia). Additionally, Lavandin essential oil may be combined with chemical constituents of Lavender or other species, such as linalyl acetate from Mentha citrata, for example, to produce a Lavender 40-42 essential oil, a 40 to 42% standardization of linalyl acetate and linalool content. This oil is most widely presented as a Lavender oil but is not acceptable in the practice of Aromatherapy.
The term ‘therapeutic grade” essential oils is both false and misleading. The term ‘certified therapeutic grade’ was actually created by um… doTERRA, who then registered the name and then told the world that all other essential oils were not as ‘pure’. They even go so far as to call them ‘better than organic’. And just to point out, their oils are NOT organic, which would make them free from pesticide residues,  genetic modification or irradiation. There are many oils on the Australian market that are just as good if not better quality than those sold by doTERRA and Young Living. This does not make them universally safe to ingest, which brings me to my next point.
I’m trying to decide which EOs to buy, to start out with, and where to buy them from. I’ve noticed that many of doTerra’s oils are MUCH more expensive than those from Mountain Rose Herbs. Why is that? Is one vastly superior over the other one? I’m on a budget and would prefer to spend less, if possible, but don’t want to sacrifice purity or quality, either.

Thank you for sharing your knowledge! I am 36 weeks pregnant and came down with a nasty cough. I couldn’t take any medicine, but yet couldn’t sleep. I used eucalyptus oil on my neck and chest to clear up my cough. I read that eucalyptus oil is not advised for pregnant women to use, however, I could not find any reasons why. Do you happen to know the risks that eucalyptus oil might have on the unborn baby? I have since stopped using the oil, but definitely used it a few times. (I will be calling my doctor, but was curious about your input.) Thank you so much!


The medicinal use of therapeutic essential oils can be very helpful and may support the body to bring rapid and welcome relief from a great variety of symptoms. However, the medicinal use of essential oils provides only a part of the many unique and powerful benefits of these complex plant essences. Therefore, the medicinal use of essential oils is best used as part of a larger, more holistic context of health and wellness, which can include mainstream medicine.
A stay-at-home mom recently e-mailed me. She is a former CAM user who once treated her infant’s colic with homeopathy but has since seen the light and is now thinking skeptically. She asked that I look into the dōTERRA company, seller of essential oils: concentrated extracts distilled from plants, containing the “essence” or distinctive odor of the plant. She said:
Citrus Essential Oils are often thought of for their light, summery aromas, but I love using citrus oils all year round. My use of the citrus oils increases during the colder months as I find them energizing and help to uplift the spirits. They are the perfect complement to blends that fight off the winter blues, "cabin fever" and depression. Read about the aromatic properties of each of the citrus essential oils.
There is no evidence to suggest essential oils are effective (or safe) as the primary treatment of diseases and symptoms that fall outside the mind-body connection. Remember, when you use an essential oil and expect a specific outcome, you are relying on the biochemical activity of the compound in question. Many plants are biochemically active in humans and classified as drugs. These “natural” products have undergone rigorous scientific study to prove they work and determine what dangers they pose.

Every one of the oils we tested offered their own unique signatures of aroma, and with this very subjective task we have undertaken, it made finding the best essential oils an extremely difficult project. Our criteria was strict and our noses were ready for the challenge. When it comes to your health we didn’t want to let money be a deterrent for finding you the truly best.
We carry several varieties of Chamomile Essential Oil. The German variety is considered to be the most popular of all the Chamomiles and has an impeccable reputation among holistic practitioners. The German Chamomile is believed to be one of the most highly reputed oils for topical use. Chamomile Essential Oil contains azulene, which gives the oil a beautiful deep blue color. The scent of this oil is mild and sweet, similar to apples, and often has a medicinal aroma with very faint bittersweet notes.
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