I’m still a beginner but I know that for many essential oils, you need what is called a carrier oil. These carrier oils mixed with the essential oil are what make it safe for skin. I suggest looking into getting the book ( aromatherapy for beginners) if you are serious about it. I’m still reading it but it has a tone of info, meanings, recipes and helpful terms of understanding. Also, it has a handy section in the back about resources online and in books to learn more and to find your essential oils. Good luck. 😀
I have done the smell test with my oils along with some friends oils and what I found was that it was a HUGE difference in smell. I would smell my NOW oil or my Aura Cacia oil and I would feel like they smelled good and like they should, then I would smell my doTerra oils and feel the same way… the wierd part is that when I smelled the other oil again I could smell that it was a little off. The other oil smelled either a little stale, watered down, almost rancid, or in the case of lavender almost like another species of plant (this can happen from being grown in a different area of the world with different soil constituents). By far doTerra won my personal smell test from all the oil companies, however I do have two others that I personally would use for therapeutic purposes and not be afraid of either external or internal use (only the oils from the GRAS EO list for internal use of course).
I would highly recommend that anyone who is interested in essential oil toxicity to read this article regarding safety, including ingestion or neat application. I found it to be very helpful. It is a comprehensive article that was also published in an aromatherapy journal. Ron Guba, the author, is a well known Australian aromatherapist. http://www.agoraindex.org/Frag_Dem/toxicitymyths.html
I’m not hear to debate semantics on the exact meanings behind doTERRA’s CPTG rating on their oils. Weather it’s a “trademark” or “certification” in the legal sense does not concern me. What I learned is that the tests are being done and they are extensive. Because of that the company can then give you their promise that they are what they say. There really are extensive test, and they are being done by companies other than doTERRA. I trust the oils because of this and the miraculous results I’ve experienced with them. I DO NOT claim that these are the only pure oils on the market. I believe what I’m reading from other bloggers who stand behind oils that give them amazing results. I think that’s wonderful and I for one hope the market for pure oils will continue to grow. I’ve found that things progress much better when “we all get along”. Working together for the highest, healthiest, outcomes is always going to go a lot further than wasting time on hostilities. The oils on the market that are not pure will eventually weed themselves out among those who use EO’s because they simply do not supply the needed results. For those of you who are new at EO’s, take the time to find ones that work, because the good ones DO work wonders. I prefer to talk about amazing, positive progress in natural health care. I do no care to argue about things that have many issues that have many sides that we may have only partial information about. Natural selection will take care of most of the problems. I will not get caught up in the blogging hostilities that pit this company against that company. I want to spend my time on the positive.
Inside the living plant, essential oils serve several purposes, one of which is defense. Acting like the plant’s immune system, the oils help it fight off fungus or bacterial infection, and protect it from insects and animals. Another purpose is reproduction; the pleasing aromas attract pollinating insects like bees and butterflies. We’re not the only animals who like the smell of flowers.
I just wanted to correct you, when you say that essential oils should not be taken internally. This is one huge difference, and deciding factor for how I select an essential oil. If I can’t eat it, I won’t use it on my skin. Anything your skin contacts, goes to your blood stream. If an oil is unsafe for consumption, you should not use it. Many oils like peppermint, wintergreen, basil, lemon, lavender, clove, etc. are great for problems like headache, nausea, indigestion, pain, flu, and other ailments. One drop under the tongue, or mixed with a teaspoonbof honey is a great way to get fast releif and healing properties to your cells without harm. This is why the brand does matter. The extraction method is very important and has everything to do with the grade of oil in the end result. Not all oils are created equal, that’s for sure. Young Living is the brand I use and trust.
He suggested an “old wives tale” remedy of tea tree oil in my shampoo. He is not typically an alternative medicine sort of guy, so I was surprised that he even suggested it. By golly it works! I have been a teacher for over thirty years –28 of them head lice free. I shared this idea with several colleagues and parents, and they all report the same results.
Aromatherapy, treating skin conditions, soothing muscle inflammation… the benefits of essential oils abound. "Essential oils can be used in personal care products, in home cleaning products, for general well-being in the context of emotional support, and many other ways," says Avery. This versatility also extends to the scents themselves. "Some of the most popular essential oils, like lavender and sweet orange, cross over into many categories and can be used effectively for many applications," she says. 
Wow, there’s quite the controversy regarding the ingesting of oils and quality of oils. You know what would be amazing… a post that helps newbies in the EO world to know about the various EO distributors aside from YL and doTerra. I feel like the market is saturated with their jargon and I’d like to know about other suppliers so that I can make my own informed decision. Would love it if you could share any other links to companies, or resources, you might now of so I can further educate myself. TIA.
To answer your questions I have to answer #2 first. Jena is right – there are a limited number of distilleries, D. Gary Young owns 1/3 of them. The products distilled to make EOs are like the contents of tea – they can be distilled multiple times but each time you do so the product you get is progressively weaker. Companies like doTERRA and Young Living only take the 1st distillation which is the strongest and most pure. They label their product therapeutic grade and 100% pure because they have run it through a mass spectrometer and have calculated the constituents in each bottle. Young Living actually refuses to sell any bottle of EO that does not meet their requirements for purity. Less expensive companies use the 2nd, 3rd, and even 5th and 6th distillation. They also dilute their products before marketing them. So it is important to know about the company you are buying from and what distillation they use. Not all distillations are equal.
There are a few essential oils that are generally recognized as safe to use undiluted. Of course, there has to be a few exceptions to the rule. Again, in Organic Body Care Recipes, the author points out that the only essential oils that are widely acknowledged as safe to use undiluted (sparingly) are: lavender, German chamomile, tea tree, sandalwood, and rose geranium.
Good question. I wonder what the moisture content of the estimated weights are (HUGE difference as water makes up the majority of a plants’ weight). Nevertheless, I would guess that the environmental impact is minimal to none as most of these plants are numerous compared to harvesting other plants such as hardwoods, rain forest plants, and even corn. Take lavender for example, if it takes 100 lbs to extract 1 lb, that is barely nothing when you consider that lavender grows wild and is abundant. One acre of lavender would probably produce over a ton of plant parts in one mowing for oil extraction (I am guessing based on my experience with a variety of different plant “harvesting”). And it grows fast. To compare weight, imagine mowing a one acre field of mixed weeds 3 ft tall down to 6 inches, you would have a few thousand pounds of plants that would quickly and naturally grow back in a couple weeks. The rose petals are at the extreme ratio but are expensive and used far less than the common oils.
The last century has seen a tremendous amount of change in the field of aromatherapy and essential oil use. A general trend to move away from synthetic chemicals back to more natural cleaning and health products have brought essential oils to the forefront and made them more readily available. With the many different essential oils to choose from, and the many brands, both in our stores and over the Internet, choosing a high quality essential oil can seem a daunting task. As a consumer, what should you look for to help guide your choice?
There are several different extraction methods and they vary depending upon the essential oil desired. Dry steam with minimal pressure is the desired process for 90% of essential oils. Cold expression, however, is ideal for citrus oils. For fragile, flower-based essential oils, such as rose and ylang-ylang, hydraulic distillation in a water bath is best. The process used to extract oils from the plant matter impacts the final quality of the essential oils and, if done correctly, preserves their longevity. 
“The absence of regulatory standards regarding the use of the terms ‘essential oil’ and ‘therapeutic grade’ are the very reason for developing a higher standard of quality control we have branded CPTG Certified Pure Therapeutic Grade®. Although there are good essential oils available to consumers, many products claiming to be essential oils often are not pure aromatic extracts and often contain fillers and non-aromatic compounds. The d?TERRA name and CPTG registered trademark represent our guarantee of 100% pure essential oil extracts and accurate product labeling.”

Let’s just think about this logically for a second. Let’s imagine you rub poison ivy on your skin and you get a really bad rash. Is that just your body detoxing? Of course not. Come on people, if you get a rash or burn from putting something on your skin its because its IRRITATING YOUR SKIN. Furthermore, this “detox” explanation seems to ignore the very definition of what it means to detox. Generally, a detox reaction is a response that the body undergoes when it has something TAKEN AWAY from it. Think of the body of a drug addict “detoxifying” during the withdrawal process as he tries to get off the drugs. But in the case of using an essential oil on your skin we are ADDING something new to our bodies that your body has no prior experience with, any bad reaction could not logically be classified as a detox reaction.
He suggested an “old wives tale” remedy of tea tree oil in my shampoo. He is not typically an alternative medicine sort of guy, so I was surprised that he even suggested it. By golly it works! I have been a teacher for over thirty years –28 of them head lice free. I shared this idea with several colleagues and parents, and they all report the same results.
One thing I wonder though (couldn’t find it on the websites you listed either) – My grandmother loves the smell of tomato leaves and I ran across a hand cream that was tomato leaf scented once when I was overseas but it was too much liquid to bring home. Is there somewhere I can find an essential oil or make one or something like it to make a nice handcream for her?
She was very kind to me and said she had been getting a lot of calls on the release due to essential oils’ popularity. She reported that the piece was meant to highlight her conversations with toxicologists on the increasing use of essential oils and exposure to children. The fact is children getting into the oils and swallowing large quantities is bad. However, this was the misuse of essential oils, not a safety issue with the proper dosing. She stated that she never meant for it to be spun and construed that essential oils were unsafe in general.
well my encounter with a doterra sales rep was very interesting, and she informed me (me being qualified and acredited clinical aromatherapist) that doterra were the purest essential oils on the world and they are so pure you dont have to use as much as other companies essential oils and that they are pure theraputic grade essential oils for internal use!!!!!! well that is illegal here in australia unless you hold an advanced diploma in aromatic medicine, i asked her what training she had to make such a dangrous statement and she said she was a sales rep. i find with most MLM compaines like YL and doterra that none of their sales reps have any form of training in aromatherapy or clinical aromatherapy to make the clams and statements they do.

Hi Megan I just started using Frankincense oil I bought from Walmart the Guruanda brand. I bought it for focus and memory. I have a test coming up this week and started using the oil for concentration. I believe its been helphing me but I have been told that Rosemary oil is better. What do you think of Guruanda. Recently I attended our Az State Fair and ran into a doTerra rep who swears their product is the best.
No, don’t use it on your skin without diluting it. You can mix a drop or two into your moisturizer or into an oil like olive or coconut. Also, for acne and blackheads you also need to look at toxins in the other products you are using and make sure you are exfoliating several times a week. A green clay mask will also help pull toxins out of the skin. Just using rosemary oil without looking at the root causes of acne and blackheads will only go so far.
Wondering how those great smelling essential oils are made? Turns out, essential oils aren’t “made” at all. They ARE “extracted” from plants, herbs and spices. But just because they are extracted from plants doesn’t mean the way they’re sourced is all the same. In fact, the way they’re extracted from the plant or herb can have a big impact on the quality. Here’s a quick rundown of the two primary ways essential oils are extracted from the plants.
The oils from Marshalls you mentioned stated they are for aromatherapy. These are fragrance oils and probably NO T pure. That’s why they are so much cheaper 🙂 and they are just for enjoying the scent vs. therapeutic benefits. I would not recommend applying them to your skin in any way but the DoTerra oils you bought can be applied once mixed with coconut oil (fractionated will not harden in cool temps), sweet almond oil, argan oil or even olive oil. Any oil you choose should be labeled organic of course
Couldn't of arrived at a better time. I fell ill with the flu the day after I received them, researched appropriate oils that help with boosting immune system an help sickness etc. Used certain ones in the diffuser and my bath and even with a carrier oil (coconut oil) on my skin and my symptoms lessened. I noticed this because the one day I didn't use the oils or diffuser my symptoms became horrendous as the day went on and I was bedridden. Again the following day I went back to using oils and the flu symptoms eased and cleared within two days. Absolute god send. Love them especially frankincense that's my fave. Thank you.
The first thing to look for to determine essential oil authenticity is that each oil is identified with the plant’s scientific or botanical name, and in appropriate cases, the chemotype. A chemotype is when the same plant, e.g. rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis), will have a different chemical profile based on where it is grown. Only some plants have chemotypes. Country of plant origin, extraction process used, and either a distillation or expiration date are also important.
Very simply, you want to read on the label — or information page for every oil — the true Latin name of the plant from which the oil was extracted, as well as the country from which the plant was harvested. Some companies will go further and tell you the method of extraction, the farming quality and also the chemical family of the oil. Plus seeing the batch number on the bottle helps you match it with its testing.
Color is a crucial element in evaluating essential oils. For example, coriander seed will have a slight color to it that is visibly different from the crystal clear coriander leaf oil.  The color of cinnamon bark oil is completely unlike the oil of the cinnamon leaf. The color of an essential oil identifies its producing organ, thus revealing the properties that oil possesses.
700 Children’s features the most current pediatric health care information and research from our pediatric experts – physicians and specialists who have seen it all. Many of them are parents and bring a special understanding to what our patients and families experience. If you have a child – or care for a child – 700 Children’s was created especially for you.
As Canada's leading supplier of quality Essential Oils, we offer the largest selection of 100% Pure, Certified Organic and Therapeutic Grade Essential Oils and Aromatherapy Products at Wholesale Prices. Essential Oils (Aromatherapy Oils) are the highly concentrated, volatile, aromatic essences of plants. All the countries of the world provide essential oils, making aromatherapy a truly global therapy. New Directions Essential Oils are pure, undiluted essences extracted directly from a variety of flowers, fruits, leaves, barks, roots, herbs, and spices.
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