Different chemotypes / species / origins generally denote different effects. So if you want a calming action from lavender, you might choose one high in linalool, perhaps French or Ukranian, and if you want a lavender that’s good for insect bites or repelling fleas, you might choose one that’s also high in some of the minor constituents – probably Australian, Bulgarian, or a lavandin.

Anyway I started to buy them and telling other people about them. One of my major concerns was the internal injestion of essential oils. Although they take E.O.s in Europe, they are given by practionioners who are educated about their various properties, and therefore understand the complexity of the oils, but also the individual reactions one might have to them. I did mention this to an American doterra person when someone came for a seminar in April, and was fobbed off with an excuse.


My neighbor recommended DoTerra to me and had her sales representative friend present me with their products. It looked, sounded, and smelled great! I filled the paperwork out and a few hours later she called me because I had failed to provide my ss# (which I had intentionally left blank.) I never followed up with her or looked into it further, but it caught me off guard! Is this normal or standard?
Also, if you drink it, you should only use a glass or stainless steel container. Glass is highly preferred over the two and the easiest for cleaning out of the previous EO. The smell/taste of an EO tends to “linger” a bit. This is usually a good thing I would think in say aromatherapy but in this case not so much…unless of course you prefer to use the same EO each time.
Hi Dave, So sorry to hear about the medical issues your family is facing. There is quite a bit written about using essential oils for cancer though I don’t have the info at my finger tips. I would be happy to see if I can find more info on where to direct you if you haven’t already found it. If you have an email or Facebook or some other way to be reached it might be a better way to converse. But either way one place you can go to get some ideas about other peoples experiences with various oils is oil-testimonials.com you can sign up for the free membership and then do searches on whatever you would like.”leukemia” “child leukemia” “Crohns” etc. It was formed for people using YL oils to share so some of the blends mentioned will be YL but it doesn’t mean you have to use YL to get the results. High quality oils are high quality oils, that said quality is so important especially when talking about treating something as major as the things you are and in my experience YL does produce high quality oils. I myself have treated Tertiary Chronic Lyme and having used both traditional antibiotics (IV, pills, suspension and sometimes all at the same time) and essential oils and can attest to the oils working as well as any other protocol I have been on without the side effects…well you probably see where I’m going. That doesn’t mean Young Living is the only company producing oils of that quality, they aren’t, nor does it mean I’m advocating the MLM approach, signing up was worth while for me to receive the discount since I order so many oils and I will sometimes order for other people at my discount but I have never pursued the business end of it. I also have and do use other companies oils and think investigating and having several sources is wise for various reasons. Anyway, sorry to go on so much your situation just struck a nerve. Feel free to contact me if you would like.
I work for an MD and upon seeing it he’s taking out his Rx pad. I told him I wanted to try this first and if I had trouble I would call. The hand was all swollen when he saw it in the AM, but by that evening when he came back the swelling had gone down. Because he believes in toxic drugs, he wouldn’t say anything the remarkable response I was getting.
In aromatherapy and perfumery, Frankincense Essential Oil is considered an exclusive and highly desirable ingredient. Since ancient times, it has been used as incense and perfume, and as an exquisite cosmetic ingredient. It is considered the most valued oil for skincare products. This oil retains the sweet, warm and woody notes of the resin from which it is extracted.
For example, Peppermint Essential Oil is used primarily as a flavoring for candies (i.e. Candy Canes), chewing gum and ice creams. It is often referred to on food ingredient labels as Oil of Peppermint or simply as Peppermint Oil. Because large food/candy manufacturers must produce a consistently flavored product, the intensity, aroma and overall flavor of the peppermint oil they use must remain consistent between each lot of oil that they purchase. Peppermint Oil manufacturers/distributors, therefore typically standardize the essential oils that they sell by establishing a blueprint of the percentage that each important constituent should reach within each essential oil. They then test the oil and then adjust the oil by adding or removing constituents until the resulting oil meets the ideal percentage.
In the follow up email that I received, it stated that they have never found any adulteration in their oils, that perhaps a compound of the oil was misidentified, and that they couldn't contact the lab that had done the testing and shown adulteration because they are located in France. I know they speak French in France, but they do have phones and email.

Very simply, you want to read on the label — or information page for every oil — the true Latin name of the plant from which the oil was extracted, as well as the country from which the plant was harvested. Some companies will go further and tell you the method of extraction, the farming quality and also the chemical family of the oil. Plus seeing the batch number on the bottle helps you match it with its testing.
It is essential to measure every compound within an oil-producing plant. They are concerned with more than fragrance, after all. The EOBBD total physical analysis measures down to 0.01% of all compounds in the essential oil. This is where quality is found. Smaller compounds are often necessary for activating the major compounds, making all the difference in whether the oils are effective for therapeutic use.
Different chemotypes / species / origins generally denote different effects. So if you want a calming action from lavender, you might choose one high in linalool, perhaps French or Ukranian, and if you want a lavender that’s good for insect bites or repelling fleas, you might choose one that’s also high in some of the minor constituents – probably Australian, Bulgarian, or a lavandin.
One of my biggest frustrations of late has been a MLM company, I won’t name names and start a whole “thing”, but they state that they have a patent on “certified therapeutic grade”. In actuality, if you research the information, the only thing that is patented, is the logo that states “certified therapeutic grade”. It has nothing to do with the actual product, just the advertising.
EOBBD evaluators shine lights through the liquid oil and measure the angle of refraction. Why? Essential oils that are sealed and created under the correct parameters will refract light at a very specific index. If oils are diluted, this refraction angle changes. The refraction index is a very reliable measurement of whether or not an essential oil is pure and unadulterated.
"Essential oils like lavender and rose can be excellent adjunctive therapy to many health issues like inflammation, pain, and high stress or anxiety levels," Trattner says. "And they can be used as the first line of defense to prevent conditions from developing or worsening. Do I recommend them to my patients? All the time—and I’ve been practicing for over two decades. But they aren’t one-size-fits-all, and they aren’t magic potions, either. If there’s too much pain or you’re facing a severe disease, then it’s time to take something stronger or talk to your doctor to create a cohesive plan of action."
I am confused on your list of EOs to avoid while nursing or pregnant. Many of these oils I have never heard being issues. I use Lemon oil regularly and ginger as well, as a nursing mother. Could you perhaps list effects of each oil for breastfeeding mothers ? I know peppermint reduces production but confused on most of the others…. you listed ” Aniseed, cedarwood, chamomile, cinnamon, clary sage, clove, ginger, jasmine, lemon, nutmeg, rosemary, sage” I use several on this list currently and was about to put in a YL order for clary sage
Parents and grandparents of children need to be aware of the fact that many of these new vaccines will be containing contaminants (such as unfilterable viral particles, bacterial particles, monkey kidney cell fragments, human fetal cells, squalene (in anthrax and some experimental swine flu vaccines), peanut oil (a likely cause of the epidemic of peanut allergies), formaldehyde and even foreign DNA fragments) as well as known neurotoxic additives such as formaldehyde and aluminum (and perhaps even mercury), all of which are known genetic toxins and known causes of  (sometimes subtle and sometimes not-so-subtle – but always preventable) brain damage, vaccine-induced epilepsy, autoimmune disorders, the so-called, but erroneously labeled “shaken baby syndrome” (now increasingly understood to represent a vaccine-induced encephalitis), SIDS (sudden infant death syndrome), dementia, autism spectrum disorders, mitochondrial toxicity, damage to the brain’s microglial and astroglial cells (the brain’s immune system), etc.

The term ‘therapeutic grade” essential oils is both false and misleading. The term ‘certified therapeutic grade’ was actually created by um… doTERRA, who then registered the name and then told the world that all other essential oils were not as ‘pure’. They even go so far as to call them ‘better than organic’. And just to point out, their oils are NOT organic, which would make them free from pesticide residues,  genetic modification or irradiation. There are many oils on the Australian market that are just as good if not better quality than those sold by doTERRA and Young Living. This does not make them universally safe to ingest, which brings me to my next point.
Color is a crucial element in evaluating essential oils. For example, coriander seed will have a slight color to it that is visibly different from the crystal clear coriander leaf oil.  The color of cinnamon bark oil is completely unlike the oil of the cinnamon leaf. The color of an essential oil identifies its producing organ, thus revealing the properties that oil possesses.
I get turned off by the organic certification label. Hey I am all for organics, I raising my own organic produce. But, when a label claims to be USDA organic certified, a red flag goes up. Manufactures use this as a marketing too, and nothing and you really do not know what you are getting unless you have a state of the art laboratory to analyze your products.
I’m not so sure that the FDA is always spot on with their statements–sometimes they tend to under–or overreact in they synopsis of what is healthy and what isn’t. However, if methyl salicylate is indeed toxic and they are moderating how much goes into packaging stickers, then should Wintergreen oil be consumed at all (or does the methyl salicylate become more neutralized when consumed with all the constituents of the oil)?
Dr Gary G. Kohls is a retired physician from Duluth, MN, USA. In the decade prior to his retirement from medicine, he had spent the last decade practicing what could best be described as “holistic (non-drug) mental health care”. Dr Kohls has been actively involved in peace, justice and nonviolence issues for much of his adult life and, since he retired, he has written a weekly column for the Duluth Reader, an alternative newsweekly magazine (www.readerduluth.com). His columns mostly deal with the dangers of American fascism, corporatism, militarism, racism, malnutrition, psychiatry and other movements that threaten American democracy and civility.
Since Jennifer admitted herself that she has “a strong aversion to MLMs, and particularly essential oil MLMs”, I wonder if she actually ever really looked into Young Living oils? However, once she was convinced that doTerra oils were good, she became a distributor for them, which, in my opinion, nearly negates any other personal opinion, as one who sells a product can hardly be objective can they?
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If you dilute an essential oil with a carrier oil to do the “patch test” to see if you are sensitive to the essential oil, and you get a reaction, you could be reacting to the carrier oil. Whatever essential oils you use, you should follow the information that comes with it. If it doesn’t come with any guidelines on the label, I would not use it at all. Some are safe to ingest, some are not. Some need to be diluted, some do not (except on babies and small children, when you should dilute).
In any form, using essential oils as green pesticides rather than synthetic pesticides has ecological benefits such as decreased residual actions.[30] In addition, increased use of essential oils as pest control could have not only ecological, but economical benefits as the essential oil market diversifies[29] and popularity increases among organic farmers and environmentally conscious consumers.[28]
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