I’m trying to decide which EOs to buy, to start out with, and where to buy them from. I’ve noticed that many of doTerra’s oils are MUCH more expensive than those from Mountain Rose Herbs. Why is that? Is one vastly superior over the other one? I’m on a budget and would prefer to spend less, if possible, but don’t want to sacrifice purity or quality, either.
Essential oils, however, are distilled and used not only in holistic aromatherapy, but as mentioned previously, are also distilled for use in the personal fragrancing, home fragrancing, cosmetic and in the food/beverage/flavoring industries. In these industries where purchasers of essential oils use them for mass production, there is far less need for "pure" essential oils and far greater need for consistent, standardized essential oils that do not change from shipment to shipment.

As we mentioned earlier, the FDA generally classifies essential oils as cosmetics, but they can also sometimes be considered drugs. In a quote direct from the US Food and Drug Administration website, “The law doesn’t require cosmetics to have FDA approval before they go on the market.” In addition, if a product claims to affect the health and function of the body, such as relieving anxiety, aiding digestion or calming sore muscles, the product must be approved by the FDA as a drug, which is a very long and costly process.
There are some essential oils that can be ingested in very small amounts. For example peppermint oil capsules, which help IBS symptoms. I have used Young Living essential oils and they are of very high quality. Whatever people decide to do it is important to remember that essential oils do not disperse into water and therefore even the ones that are safe to ingest need to be taken with a dispersant drink, like milk or within special capsule. It is advisable to consult a professional in any case. All the best.
The most important terms to look for regarding the way the plants are grown and harvested are: Certified Organic, Wild Harvested, or unofficially organic (sometimes called “unsprayed”). A reputable essential oil company will freely disclose all information about where and how their source plants are grown, and they’ll be proud of their organic choices.
This is the first time that I purchase Frankincense and I am glad I did. I want you to know that my knowledge about essential oils is very minimal so I am only writing this review based on my humble experience with it. I use the oil mainly for meditation (grounding and purpose), which I practice twice a day for 30 minutes. Before I set my practice, I take the little bottle and I bring it right to my nostrils. Then, I deeply inhale the aroma and I exhale through my mouth (I repeat this 3 times). If I need to interpret the aroma, I will say that it has a sweet and woodsy feeling to it. It almost reminds me of the smell of pines in a warm summer night...but not quite. I truly enjoy my experience of the Frankincense oil during meditation. Now that I have fallen in love with its charming and mysterious scent, I know I will buy more. By the way, I have to say that the seller's customer care was stellar from the very beginning.
Hi Linda. I don’t know about restoring hearing but I have been using oils with good results for tinnitus and hearing that sounds like I’m in a tunnel. It seems my right ear is trying to loose some of it’s high pitch hearing. Whenever I have this happen I use a combo of oils. Helichrysum is one of them. I rub it around the inside of my ear (never drop oils into the canal). Then I apply Frankinsence, Basil, Rosemary, and Melaleuca on the bones in front and back of the ear and down the neck where the eustachian tube is. Sometimes I’ll put a drop on a very small cotten ball and place it in my ear while I sleep. I’m using this now as preventive as my hearing has returned and the tinnitus has stopped. I only do this 2-4 times a month now. But at the first signs of anything happening in my ear I resume doing it twice a day. I’m in my fifties now so I can’t afford to take chances.
Botanical Name. High quality essential oils should have the botanical or “scientific” name (genus and species of the plant) listed on the label. Beware that inferior oils will blend certain plant essential oils together that do not make a “healthy mix” and are therefore not good for your health. It is also common for some oils to be made from cheaper or less therapeutic plant species and then misleadingly labeled as “therapeutic” grade oil. Lavender oil is a prime example, where hybrid “lavandins” are often used instead of the genuine and authentic Lavandula augustifolia vera.
FAST FACTS: Treats a variety of skin problems, such as acne, psoriasis, eczema, and dermatitis; removes warts and skin tags; wards off infection from piercings, scrapes, bruises, cuts, bites, or burns; great for shaving or razor bumps; kills and prevents mold in your homes; prevents cavities and gum disease; can be easily added to your shampoo or conditioner or other hair care products; medicinal grade; ISO certified; certified by the USA Medicinal Oil Association
Hi Clint, the Aura Cacia oregano oil is not solvent extracted. In fact, no essential oils are extracted with solvents. Only absolutes like Jasmine and Rose are solvent extracted, and absolutes are not essential oils. Oregano oil is safe to ingest, so long as you take care to avoid mucous membrane irritation by only taking it in capsules that also contain a vegetable oil.
I myself have a preference for a particular company because of my own personal results and the consistent reports of my clients. I am also passionate about quality due to the way I use oils. I do stick with what has worked for me and my clients consistently. However, when reporting the information on this blog, I try to keep the facts and put my experience and company suggestions in a separate section and on a different website clearly delineated.
So just to be clear – there is no “therapeutic grade” for any essential oil that relates to AFNOR, the EC, or ISO, and there are no separate essential oil standards set by AFNOR or the EC. So we are left with one thing – YL conforms to ISO standards. Great, that’s a good thing, but it’s far from unique. I think I already said most of this in the article that these comments derive from.
Even taking Young out of the picture, the business model for these companies is problematic. Two of the biggest essential oil companies, Young Living and doTERRA, work as multi-level marketing schemes. Salespeople in the companies are known as distributors who buy the products at wholesale prices and mark them up to sell them to consumers. “But the real money,” Monroe writes, “comes from recruiting other distributors into your ‘downline’ and getting a commission on their sales.”

I apologize for not responding to the new comments on this post from 2009 and hadn’t realized they had been submitted. Obviously this subject has come up again and people are searching the net looking for answers. Tim, I’ve been working on that blog post; it’s languishing as other priorities have pushed it further down the to-do pile. Tammy, you are right that it is complicated and not an easy task to simplify for the person who has not studied . . . both aromatherapy and the aspects surrounding the essential oil trade. I will get it closer to the top of the list now that I see how desirable this information might be to many of you. Karen, I’m glad you enjoyed our products. My intent is not to “bash” any one company, but I will continue to interject facts as I know them that might be helpful to those I believe are being misled. Danika, you make a very good point that the MLM business model is not necessarily the culprit itself when it comes to unethical business practices. I happen to believe it isn’t the best business model, but that’s another discussion . . . thanks to all of you for taking the time to share your thoughts.

Plus, I don’t care how wonderful an EO is, I don’t think a certain combo is going to make someone “Thankful” or give them “Couraqe.” Those are personality traits, not a response to treatment. Seems a bit hokey to me. I just gave her the catalog back and didn’t say much. The MLM system is designed to make people antagonize their friends into feeling obligated to purchase stuff.


This is something that should be readily available. For example, the company Aromatics International lists their oil data right on the respective product pages. Most often, you won't often find this posted on websites, but upon request, you should be able to receive it. According to Aromatics, "Gas Chromatography (GC) is a method of separating the volatile compounds in essential oils into individual components and produces a linear graph that charts these components. Mass Spectrometry (MS) identifies each of these components and their percentages. This process is used to identify any adulteration of the essential oil tested. The precise breakdown of the chemical components in individual oils given to us by GC/MS reports are important as the therapeutic benefits and safety issues of essential oils are, in large part, determined by their chemical makeup." (Source)
question please, enjoyed the article thank you. Business aspect didnt work out, but use doTerra, because i trust their Testers/Scientists, but on the GRAS, if i go uptown, how do i know because it says that, its safe to ingest? doT is costly, so want to know how to answer ? or help others, after reading, all seems a scam in marketing. NOT in any way saying they do not work, they DO, i just want to know on what to trust to ingest, thank you so much, Teresa
Essential oils are often used for aromatherapy, a form of alternative medicine in which healing effects are ascribed to aromatic compounds. Aromatherapy may be useful to induce relaxation, but there is not sufficient evidence that essential oils can effectively treat any condition.[3] Improper use of essential oils may cause harm including allergic reactions and skin irritation, and children may be particularly susceptible to the toxic effects of improper use.[4][5]
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