Essential oils prices at The Ananda Apothecary are fair, not too steep but also not too good to be true. Their specialty oils like Sandalwood, Helichrysum, or Rose are properly and fairly priced higher (as they should be), indicating a true quality product behind the label rather than a quick sale. Certain essential oils are just more expensive due to the incredible amount of effort and volume of plant materials required to produce the bottle of oil you buy.
very interesting. I am just a stay at home mama trying to do the best for my family. We use EO’s everyday, I clean with them, I diffuse them and I ingest them. If my throat is sore, I have a mixture of straight oils that I take, I’m not endorsing a brand, but I have several mixtures that have cured my asthma and my sons, we both put them directly in our chest. I’ve been to my natural path and he doesn’t endorse this particular brand but he tested the oils in is and to,d us which ones were beneficial to each of us. If you have access to a certified herbalist who can do energy testing it is very helpful to find out what works for you- if you can get passed the cost 😉
For some years now I have been applying several drops each of undiluted pure essential oils patchouli, ylang ylang, sandalwood and cedarwood to my neck and throat after a shower, and the fragrance is wonderful, but as a bonus this same fragrance comes up from the toilet bowl every time I do a dump. To confirm I wasn’t imagining it, the first time it happened I smelt the loo paper after the first wipe and there was the fragrance of all those essential oils. Why is this, and has anyone else had the same experience ? I must be one of the very few people in the world who can say that not only does their shit not stink, but that it is exotically perfumed !
Potential essential oil buyers should independently check out the marketing information provided by essential oil traders - do not be put off asking for any extra information or reassurances that you are legally entitled to if the situation is not absolutely clear cut. The professional aromatherapist has a duty to be able to provide all relevant safety information relevant to to their clients’ treatment(s) and therefore it is part of ‘due diligence’ to ask questions, require any stipulated proofs, request an MSDS, ask for compositional data & certificate of origin of the batch of oil purchased and have their eyes wide open to marketing ploys & scams of all types - including providing GC’MS print-outs and other information which relate to other batches of oils entirely, and, of course, describing essential oils as ‘therapeutic grade’.
Yes, essential oil adulteration exists, though this doesn’t always involve synthetic chemicals. One of the most common frauds is to add lavandin oil to lavender oil, though this is not difficult to detect with GC analysis. But, the idea that virtually all essential oils that are sold in health stores are, by definition, adulterated, is baseless. There is no evidence for it, and there never has been any.
Yes, essential oil adulteration exists, though this doesn’t always involve synthetic chemicals. One of the most common frauds is to add lavandin oil to lavender oil, though this is not difficult to detect with GC analysis. But, the idea that virtually all essential oils that are sold in health stores are, by definition, adulterated, is baseless. There is no evidence for it, and there never has been any.
Essential oils aren’t really oils in the true sense of the word. They are complex mixtures of aromatic compounds extracted from plant material. They have distinct odors, poor solubility in water (a trait they share with true oils), and are extracted from plants by distillation and cold pressing. Common examples include lavender, peppermint, tea tree and eucalyptus, but you’ll find hundreds more.

There is no need to buy YL essential oils unless you truly want to. They are expensive and their aggressive sales pitch will try to convince you that if you aren’t buying their brand, you are buying junk. Not true. There are other great essential oil companies out there. Mountain Rose, Plant Therapy, Eden’s Garden and Rocky Mountain Oils are all great places to buy your oils. They are very high quality and at much lower prices. At least two of those companies offer free shipping all the time. I buy most of my oils from Plant Therapy but also occasionally from Mountain Rose and Rocky Mountain Oils. I have never been disappointed! 🙂


Currently organic essential oils are perceived as the answer to these purity and quality problems, but choosing an “organic” essential oil does not mean it is pure or even good quality. Organic herbs and food is an ideal that is worth striving for and it positively impacts our health. Unfortunately, regulating and verifying the organic status of essential oils is not so clear because there are no developed guidelines and routine analytical procedures.
This isn’t a list of oils specifically, but they do have an up-to-date list of endangered plants http://www.unitedplantsavers.org/ This company is started by the same woman who helped start Mountain Rose Herbs, so they are trying to support farmers who will grow the endangered plants so we can have a sustainable supply of them on the market while they are being responsibly propagated. Its pretty awesome

If you are using Firefox or Google Chrome as a browser there is an app/add-on called “adblocker plus”. Download and install it. When you see floating icons like that and they bother you, right-click over them and scroll down to “block element” or “use adblock” and click OK/Submit/Add. This will remove the floating script/image and allow for better viewing.


So just to be clear – there is no “therapeutic grade” for any essential oil that relates to AFNOR, the EC, or ISO, and there are no separate essential oil standards set by AFNOR or the EC. So we are left with one thing – YL conforms to ISO standards. Great, that’s a good thing, but it’s far from unique. I think I already said most of this in the article that these comments derive from.
None. Essential oils are wonderful, but I would never recommend taking them internally unless you are being treated by a Clinical Aromatherapist. Since most EOs are antimicrobal you can really upset your gut flora by taking them long term. And since 85% of your immunity is in your gut, that’s really something you don’t want to do unless you are under the treatment of someone with the above-listed training.
Bath: Avoid dripping your essential oil directly into the bath water; you always want to mix it first with a natural emulsifier like honey, milk, a carrier oil, or even sea salt. Doing this will help emulsify and disperse the essential oils into the water. If you don’t do this, the oils will simply sit on the surface of the water and come into direct contact with your skin, possibly causing burns and dermal toxicity.
To minimize the risks of topical essential oil application, it’s best to dilute essential oils with a carrier oil, or a neutral oil that can contain the essential oil. "Most allergic reactions are caused by the application of pure oils, or high-concentration products," Lortscher says. "But if you tolerate them or dilute them, they can help with dry, flaky skin, provide some antioxidant benefits, and also help relax your body."
Samantha has a popular health and fitness blog called Jacked on the Beanstalk where she shares her secrets to success, including fitness, meal plans coaching and why she decided to adopt a vegan lifestyle and how it has helped her become so successful. Samantha was awarded her pro card in July 2014 after winning first place in the overall bikini title at the 2014 INBF South Western Natural Championships in Austin Texas. This put her on the map as the first-ever VEGAN WNBF bikini pro.
Hi! Is it necessary to dilute an oil if you’re going to inhale the vapor, rather than use it topically? I’m asking because I had been rubbing a drop of frankincense on the palms of my hands and then inhaling to treat asthma. After awhile, I developed a reaction on my skin. Now I’m applying the oil to a piece of paper in a ziploc bag and inhaling from that to avoid skin contact.
In her New Yorker piece, Monroe goes into detail about Young Living (the self-described “World Leader in Essential Oils”) founder Gary Young’s questionable background, which includes opening a health center in Washington state in 1982 where his own daughter died from a birthing service in which she was submerged for an hour in a whirlpool bath; being arrested for practicing medicine without a license; and opening a clinic in Tijuana where he made false diagnoses to get patients to join a costly detox program.

I think it’s wonderful that you’re starting somewhere. I used the NOW brand for several years with great results. I’ve recently discovered Young Living and WOW way different. I’ve found that the brands in our local stores are cut with carriers and preservatives. Young Living is completely pure. I mean a small bottle of sandalwood from NOW costs about $15. Young Living’s cost well over $100. The difference is that YL offers completely pure oils. A closer look at my NOW sandalwood bottle showed that it was in a carrier oil. I prefer to buy my own carriers and mix my favorite oils into them on my own. Wishing you continued success!


doTERRA wanted to create a purity level that goes above and beyond organic. So they created an internal standard called Certified Pure Therapeutic Grade that is verified by 3rd party testing laboratories. They test their oils 7 different ways to make sure that they are pure and safe for therapeutic use. Even though doTERRA essential oils are not “certified organic“(read why in next paragraph), you can be assured that they are a step above organic.

We got rid of a bad bedbug infestation in the house with, well it was either Tea Tree oil or Lavender oil, mixed into spray bottles with 91% alcohol. We weren’t shy about it either, our 1st experience with EOs. We burned through 2oz bottles of each and the bugs vaporized and were gone in two days! They really don’t much like the air that clean and fresh.
~ Yes, many of the executives/owners are LDS (members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, the “Mormons”). They probably do pay tithing on their income if they are faithful members of their church. Do you agree with what every executive who runs every company does with the money he/she earns from the products you purchase? Many, if not most, large corporations donate money to causes they are interested in or benefit them. Do you agree with all of those causes? Enough said.
I have nothing to do with this company. Furthermore, I did not spend much time writing about doTerra – and by the way, the term “bashing” is generally reserved for propaganda, i.e., baseless claims based on no evidence, such as yours. As a health care provider, when I come up against an anti-science claim that could be dangerous for consumers, I do take a good look at the evidence and the claims – and when the opportunity arises, I do let people know what I found.

I was introduced to doTERRA a couple years ago. As an aromatherapist with a strong aversion to MLMs, and particularly essential oil MLMs, I had many questions, doubts, and hesitations. But, I bought a few, started using them, asked questions, did research into their sourcing, and listened to people who knew the owners to glean what I could about their integrity and purpose. I worried about their encouragement of internal and undiluted use of the essential oils since I had learned that this was not acceptable, except by someone qualified to determine proper use.
ISO stands for ‘International Organization for Standardization’. The "9001:2015" designation is the ISO specified ‘Standard’ (benchmark) under which the Quality Management System is certified for a organization/company (in question). Since 2015, Herbs Village has employed a quality system meeting the requirements of ISO 9001:2015 ‘Quality Standards’ for set custom packaging of essential oils and other allied products in their offered range of products.
I've been a member of the National Association of Holistic Aromatherapy (NAHA) for a number of years. Upon renewing my membership several years ago, I spotted that their membership application/renewal form, at that time, prohibited membership to those companies that use these terms. It was that policy that lead me to then take a fresh look at the terms therapeutic grade and aromatherapy grade and realize how confusing these terms can be to consumers. Having said that, I have noticed that NAHA, under different leadership, no longer includes the statements on their applications that prohibit membership to companies that use these terms.
I went to a seminar on Friday with Dr David K Hill, who was demonstrating his Aromatouch technique. I learnt the Aromatherapy massage as created by Marguerite Maury in the 1970’s, as my Aromatherapy tutor was one of her students in London. There was nothing signicantly different, apart from the oils that were to be used at every stage. One of the blends called Deep Blue ( which does seems to work) contains Wintergreen Camphor, Peppermint, Blue Tansy, and Osmanthus.The other oil to be used was On Guard which contains Wintergreen, Clove Bud, Cinnamon, Eucalyptus and Rosemary. one of the questions asked was” is it safe to be used on a pregnant women?” Dr Hill answered “yes’, and said he would even use these oils in the first trimester. Now I know I may be a little bit rusty, but aren’t oils such as Wintergreen Camphor, Blue Tansy, Osmanthus, Clove Cinnamon,Peppermint, and Rosemary all contraindicated in pregnancy? That statement made me feel uncomfortable.
Some consumers add essential oils to their baths, or use them as home remedies, such as inhaling eucalyptus vapors to relieve congestion.Others may place the oils in a diffuser to scent the air — peppermint is promoted for stimulating alertness, and lavender is often listed as a way to promote calmness, although there are no rigorous studies to support such claims.
Thank you so much for the objective, thorough information! I have some questions about “organic certification”. My understanding, with plants or foods that are produced organically, is that 100% organic is impossible because of cross contamination. So in the case of EO’s is organic less important because any chemical (ie pesticides, herbicides) that is not part of the oil is removed in the distillation process, or it is considered adulterated? For example, a company might state their oils are “certifiably organic” but they could still be contaminated because this certification allows a small percentage of contaminants. Any clarification would be greatly appreciated!
I can tell you that I have a lot of allergies, and I thought it was to the oils themselves. When I tried doTERRA’s oils, I found that I did not react to them the way I had before. That showed me that I was not reacting to the oils themselves, but the contaminants in the oils. I, too, found that the oils were more “pure” smelling, or cleaner, than other oils. I did not purchase their “kids” but took samples to try on my own family. I repeatedly found their oils to meet or exceed their claims and indications. So, doTERRA may make big claims, but in my experience they back it up.
Parents and grandparents of children need to be aware of the fact that many of these new vaccines will be containing contaminants (such as unfilterable viral particles, bacterial particles, monkey kidney cell fragments, human fetal cells, squalene (in anthrax and some experimental swine flu vaccines), peanut oil (a likely cause of the epidemic of peanut allergies), formaldehyde and even foreign DNA fragments) as well as known neurotoxic additives such as formaldehyde and aluminum (and perhaps even mercury), all of which are known genetic toxins and known causes of  (sometimes subtle and sometimes not-so-subtle – but always preventable) brain damage, vaccine-induced epilepsy, autoimmune disorders, the so-called, but erroneously labeled “shaken baby syndrome” (now increasingly understood to represent a vaccine-induced encephalitis), SIDS (sudden infant death syndrome), dementia, autism spectrum disorders, mitochondrial toxicity, damage to the brain’s microglial and astroglial cells (the brain’s immune system), etc.
Although an extensive trade of odoriferous material has been shown to have occurred in the ancient Orient and ancient Greece and Rome, the oils used were not essential oils per se, “rather they were obtained by placing flowers, roots, and other plant material into a fatty oil of best quality, submitting the glass bottles containing these mixtures to the warming influence of the sun and finally separating odoriferous oil from the solid constituents”.2

Our commitment is to provide the highest quality 100% natural products in the world. If something isn’t working for you, we want to make it right. Formulations that do not take care of your wellness needs can be refunded with the original receipt. Without receipt, we will happily exchange your item for an alternative blend that better supports your wellness or issue a gift card.
Developing essential oil standards for essential oil therapy/aromatherapy has been discussed in several circles over the years, but because of cost of administration, setting up labs, certifying them and the analysis cost all by itself, it has turned out to be an overwhelming task and cost that only a well-organized and well funded organization could handle. But, an organizational attempt to deal with the analytical and administrative challenge for self-regulation would be desirable before essential oil therapy/aromatherapy looses its “therapy” from an overdose of bad oils.
” Essential oils are wholly natural and cannot be patented; which means that you’ll never see an essential oil in a pharmaceutical drug. As such, you can expect that the vast majority of mainstream healthcare practitioners will never recommend essential oils as therapeutic alternatives to drugs. More importantly, because essential oils cannot be patented, drug companies will not waste money studying them. This limits our scientific knowledge of essential oils GREATLY, and the majority of what we know about them are things that have been passed down through thousands of years of personal use and experimentation.” So how can any claim to be “therapeutic”….? WE all know they work but….
Someone in the audience then asked him about his connected to YL. He was clearly thrown by the question, and said in the end that he wanted to move onto other toipcs but that he had left the company, because he did not like what they were doing. He also told a few stories concerning patients of his that had cancer, including a man called John that was given two weeks to live, and how he had felt so sad that as a doctor John would have been one of his first patients that would die. Until someone in the audience mention that ‘John’ was also the man in his book that miraclously recovered. This seemd to jog Dr. Hill’s memory, and he said yes that the man had no signs of cancer and was cured. Ummm….
Diffusion is the process of dispersing essential oils so that their aroma fills a room or an area with the essential oil fragrance. Therefore, a diffuser is a device that diffuses the essential oil into the air. There are several types of diffusers available on the market in 2018, and many have reviews that may help you decide which one may be right for you, if you are interested in getting a diffuser.
Most eucalyptus oil on the market is produced from the leaves of Eucalyptus globulus. Steam-distilled eucalyptus oil is used throughout Asia, Africa, Latin America and South America as a primary cleaning/disinfecting agent added to soaped mop and countertop cleaning solutions; it also possesses insect and limited vermin control properties.[38] Note, however, there are hundreds of species of eucalyptus, and perhaps some dozens are used to various extents as sources of essential oils. Not only do the products of different species differ greatly in characteristics and effects, but also the products of the very same tree can vary grossly.[39]
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